How the USS Lexington kept the lights on in Tacoma in 1929 after a severe drought
Jan 15, 2021 12:00 PM
William "Bill" Lokey
How the USS Lexington kept the lights on in Tacoma in 1929 after a severe drought
Our speaker next week will be William Lokey and will be speaking on the incredible story of how the Lady Lex Lit Up Tacoma! This is a piece of regional history that is little known.
This is the story of how the USS Lexington kept the lights on in Tacoma in 1929 after a severe drought.
After Antarctica, William had a 40-year career in emergency management, working at the local, state, and federal levels and as a private-sector consultant. He has worked many disasters, including the Mount St. Helens (1980); the Northridge Earthquake (1993); the Oklahoma City Bombing (1995), the World Trade Center in NY after 9/11, Hurricane Katrina (2005); and the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan (2011). He has shared his expertise throughout the USA, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ecuador, Thailand, Singapore, and Japan.
Speaker Bio/Intro;
William Lokey - Adventurer, Mountaineer, Emergency Manager, Polar Logistician, and Amateur History Buff
William Lokey has enjoyed a 50-year career of travel and adventure, supporting science in the Polar Regions and helping communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from all kinds of disasters.
During his summers in college (he has a degree in Sculpture from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio), he worked for the Juneau Icefield Research Program supporting student training and research programs.
Later, he managed logistics and provided survival training for the US Antarctic Program, doing four tours, wintering over on three occasions.